Over the years, my work has explored natural phenomena, such as the freezing point of water and how it becomes structurally hexagonal when frozen. I’ve focused on how cell imagery mimics largescale patterns of human development seen from 30,000 feet. I’ve also been intrigued by how geometric forms exist as perfect shapes when considered mathematically, but in nature are always expressed imperfectly and organically.

My love of studying natural patterns began when I was a teenager, roaming the countryside of the Californian North Bay with a camera. In college, I majored in Religious Studies, but had yet to merge my creative interests with my intellectual pursuits. Now, my in current series, I combine religious art conventions with my studio work by creating large scale “holy nature” triptychs. The great altarpiece paintings of the early Middle Ages are deeply affecting and sumptuous. In my contemporary echo of these monumental works, I use natural elements in place of the religious. Our environment is on the pedestal. The series is titled “Cathedral” and each painting’s name comes from phrases of Rumi’s poetry, the 13th Century Sufi mystic. The resulting abstract landscapes are both imagined and familiar.

Artists who have influenced my work include Wassily Kandinsky, Henri Matisse, Frank Stella, Ruth Asawa, Monir Farmanfarmaian, and Jan van Eyck.

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Over the years, my work has explored natural phenomena, such as the freezing point of water and how it becomes structurally hexagonal when frozen. I’ve focused on how cell imagery mimics largescale patterns of human development seen from 30,000 feet. I’ve also been intrigued by how geometric forms exist as perfect shapes when considered mathematically, but in nature are always expressed imperfectly and organically.

My love of studying natural patterns began when I was a teenager, roaming the countryside of the Californian North Bay with a camera. In college, I majored in Religious Studies, but had yet to merge my creative interests with my intellectual pursuits. Now, my in current series, I combine religious art conventions with my studio work by creating large scale “holy nature” triptychs. The great altarpiece paintings of the early Middle Ages are deeply affecting and sumptuous. In my contemporary echo of these monumental works, I use natural elements in place of the religious. Our environment is on the pedestal. The series is titled “Cathedral” and each painting’s name comes from phrases of Rumi’s poetry, the 13th Century Sufi mystic. The resulting abstract landscapes are both imagined and familiar.

Artists who have influenced my work include Wassily Kandinsky, Henri Matisse, Frank Stella, Ruth Asawa, Monir Farmanfarmaian, and Jan van Eyck.

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